Event Programme

Key: Sesson Types

Leadership & Management
Staff Development & Wellbeing
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment
Language Teaching & Learning
Sponsor slot
Management Training
Eaquals Inspectors' CPD

27th
Thursday Programme

Management Training Day - Session 1
Management Training

Management Training Day - Session 1

Time: 

The aim of this training day is to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into establishing and maintaining a culture of quality in their institution by exploring four E’s – Encourage, Excel, Evaluate, Ensure.

During the management training day, each of these elements will be addressed in detail with a specific focus on;

  • the meaning of quality for all stakeholders at an educational institution
  • the role of vision, mission and values of an organization in ensuring quality
  • different ways of ensuring higher employee engagement
  • training or development opportunities to increase individual and institutional competence
  • systematic evaluation of institutional and individual performance
  • the role of effective leadership in ensuring quality
  • quality assurance systems and practices

All participants will have the opportunity to reflect on and share their own experiences, exchange ideas as well as thinking of how to implement these elements, which is believed to have a significant impact on their future institutional practices.

The aim of this training day is to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into establishing and maintaining a culture of quality in their institution by exploring four E’s – Encourage, Excel, Evaluate, Ensure.

During the management training day, each of these elements will be addressed in detail with a specific focus on;

  • the meaning of quality for all stakeholders at an educational institution
  • the role of vision, mission and values of an organization in ensuring quality
  • different ways of ensuring higher employee engagement
  • training or development opportunities to increase individual and institutional competence
  • systematic evaluation of institutional and individual performance
  • the role of effective leadership in ensuring quality
  • quality assurance systems and practices

All participants will have the opportunity to reflect on and share their own experiences, exchange ideas as well as thinking of how to implement these elements, which is believed to have a significant impact on their future institutional practices.

Eaquals Inspectors' CPD - Session 1

Coffee break & exhibition

Management Training Day - Session 2
Management Training

Management Training Day - Session 2

Time: 

The aim of this training day is to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into establishing and maintaining a culture of quality in their institution by exploring four E’s – Encourage, Excel, Evaluate, Ensure.

During the management training day, each of these elements will be addressed in detail with a specific focus on;

  • the meaning of quality for all stakeholders at an educational institution
  • the role of vision, mission and values of an organization in ensuring quality
  • different ways of ensuring higher employee engagement
  • training or development opportunities to increase individual and institutional competence
  • systematic evaluation of institutional and individual performance
  • the role of effective leadership in ensuring quality
  • quality assurance systems and practices

All participants will have the opportunity to reflect on and share their own experiences, exchange ideas as well as thinking of how to implement these elements, which is believed to have a significant impact on their future institutional practices.

The aim of this training day is to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into establishing and maintaining a culture of quality in their institution by exploring four E’s – Encourage, Excel, Evaluate, Ensure.

During the management training day, each of these elements will be addressed in detail with a specific focus on;

  • the meaning of quality for all stakeholders at an educational institution
  • the role of vision, mission and values of an organization in ensuring quality
  • different ways of ensuring higher employee engagement
  • training or development opportunities to increase individual and institutional competence
  • systematic evaluation of institutional and individual performance
  • the role of effective leadership in ensuring quality
  • quality assurance systems and practices

All participants will have the opportunity to reflect on and share their own experiences, exchange ideas as well as thinking of how to implement these elements, which is believed to have a significant impact on their future institutional practices.

Eaquals Inspectors' CPD - Session 2

Lunch & exhibition

Management Training Day - Session 3
Management Training

Management Training Day - Session 3

Time: 

The aim of this training day is to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into establishing and maintaining a culture of quality in their institution by exploring four E’s – Encourage, Excel, Evaluate, Ensure.

During the management training day, each of these elements will be addressed in detail with a specific focus on;

  • the meaning of quality for all stakeholders at an educational institution
  • the role of vision, mission and values of an organization in ensuring quality
  • different ways of ensuring higher employee engagement
  • training or development opportunities to increase individual and institutional competence
  • systematic evaluation of institutional and individual performance
  • the role of effective leadership in ensuring quality
  • quality assurance systems and practices

All participants will have the opportunity to reflect on and share their own experiences, exchange ideas as well as thinking of how to implement these elements, which is believed to have a significant impact on their future institutional practices.

The aim of this training day is to provide participants with the opportunity to gain a deeper insight into establishing and maintaining a culture of quality in their institution by exploring four E’s – Encourage, Excel, Evaluate, Ensure.

During the management training day, each of these elements will be addressed in detail with a specific focus on;

  • the meaning of quality for all stakeholders at an educational institution
  • the role of vision, mission and values of an organization in ensuring quality
  • different ways of ensuring higher employee engagement
  • training or development opportunities to increase individual and institutional competence
  • systematic evaluation of institutional and individual performance
  • the role of effective leadership in ensuring quality
  • quality assurance systems and practices

All participants will have the opportunity to reflect on and share their own experiences, exchange ideas as well as thinking of how to implement these elements, which is believed to have a significant impact on their future institutional practices.

Eaquals Inspectors' CPD - Session 3

Coffee break & exhibition

Eaquals Inspectors' CPD - Session 4

28th
Friday Programme

Conference opening

Opening Plenary, Tim Goodier Memorial Plenary: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in ELT: Deconstructing the myth of Excellence

Coffee break & exhibition

Eaquals Members: Discussion Groups
Introduction to Eaquals – Accreditation (Overview)
Introduction to Eaquals – Frameworks

Eaquals Members: Discussion Groups - continued
Introduction to Eaquals – Case Study - An Arduous but Worthwhile Journey to Excellence in Quality

Introduction to Eaquals – Case Study - An Arduous but Worthwhile Journey to Excellence in Quality

Time: 

We would like to share our rewarding experience to our recent Eaquals accreditation with the metaphor “Journey”. We would define our journey to Eaquals Accreditation as a shortcut to the summit of a steep well-signed mountain. When working towards our targets, we drove through sharp turns, winding or bumpy roads, and/or straightforward at times. Thanks to our road map which enabled us to cope with the difficulties and reach the summit which had a roundabout with some rails around to safeguard motorists. Our conclusion was that “When there is a will, there is a way”.

We would like to share our rewarding experience to our recent Eaquals accreditation with the metaphor “Journey”. We would define our journey to Eaquals Accreditation as a shortcut to the summit of a steep well-signed mountain. When working towards our targets, we drove through sharp turns, winding or bumpy roads, and/or straightforward at times. Thanks to our road map which enabled us to cope with the difficulties and reach the summit which had a roundabout with some rails around to safeguard motorists. Our conclusion was that “When there is a will, there is a way”.

Introduction to Eaquals – Resources

Lunch & exhibition

Elective Session 1
Joint Leadership in Action: Giving a fresh breath of life to in-house teacher development
Leadership & Management

Joint Leadership in Action: Giving a fresh breath of life to in-house teacher development

Time: 

What can a school do to support innovation and best practices? What happens when these efforts are perceived as routine by the educators and they abstain? Several years after its introduction, “Innovation and Best Practices Days”, an in-house professional event promoting continuous professional development and novelty in daily teaching, seemed to wane irreversibly. Routine had taken its toll. Shifting from traditional to joint leadership achieved the revival of this practice and sparked an interest among the school educators by diversifying its contribution to the school community, creating a repository and exploiting peer-to-peer support. The session conveys the experience gained during this two-year journey, the challenges and opportunities arising when applying joint leadership in times of a crisis. It is worth taking into consideration that the team was formed during the Covid 19 lockdown under conditions that prevented team bonding. The presenters will share details about the course of action, the initiatives and policies implemented and statistics that illustrate the above.

What can a school do to support innovation and best practices? What happens when these efforts are perceived as routine by the educators and they abstain? Several years after its introduction, “Innovation and Best Practices Days”, an in-house professional event promoting continuous professional development and novelty in daily teaching, seemed to wane irreversibly. Routine had taken its toll. Shifting from traditional to joint leadership achieved the revival of this practice and sparked an interest among the school educators by diversifying its contribution to the school community, creating a repository and exploiting peer-to-peer support. The session conveys the experience gained during this two-year journey, the challenges and opportunities arising when applying joint leadership in times of a crisis. It is worth taking into consideration that the team was formed during the Covid 19 lockdown under conditions that prevented team bonding. The presenters will share details about the course of action, the initiatives and policies implemented and statistics that illustrate the above.

Plenary Q&A
"I'm just no good at English." Building confidence with the Global Scale of English
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

"I'm just no good at English." Building confidence with the Global Scale of English

Time: 

How many times have you heard your students say “I’m just no good at English!” Negative emotions are known to have a significant impact on learning outcomes and, if left unchecked, those negative emotions can lead to a fixed mindset that convinces the learner that no matter how hard they try, they will simply never master the skill.
As well as being subject matter experts, teachers also need to understand the psychology of learning. What is the most effective and efficient way to learn? What psychological factors come into play when creating the right environment for successful learning? And how do we move from a theoretical understanding of these factors to practical application in our day-to-day teaching?
This presentation explores the psychology of learning – and more specifically language learning – and suggests ways in which English teachers can use the Global Scale of English resources to set their learners up for success and build the confidence that will support them on their life-long learning journey.

How many times have you heard your students say “I’m just no good at English!” Negative emotions are known to have a significant impact on learning outcomes and, if left unchecked, those negative emotions can lead to a fixed mindset that convinces the learner that no matter how hard they try, they will simply never master the skill.
As well as being subject matter experts, teachers also need to understand the psychology of learning. What is the most effective and efficient way to learn? What psychological factors come into play when creating the right environment for successful learning? And how do we move from a theoretical understanding of these factors to practical application in our day-to-day teaching?
This presentation explores the psychology of learning – and more specifically language learning – and suggests ways in which English teachers can use the Global Scale of English resources to set their learners up for success and build the confidence that will support them on their life-long learning journey.

Accent Anxiety: From Definitions to Solutions in the Foreign Language Classroom
Language Teaching & Learning

Accent Anxiety: From Definitions to Solutions in the Foreign Language Classroom

Time: 

Speaking anxiety reduces learners’ willingness to communicate. This session presents the findings of a study carried out with French learners of English. The study sought to explore a subsection of speaking anxiety – specifically, anxiety that arises due to learners’ apprehension about speaking English with a non-native accent, or hereby termed “accent anxiety”.
The session will give a theoretical overview of accent anxiety, before examining the findings of the study by looking at direct quotations from students. The session concludes with some practical solutions for language learners and educators alike to minimise accent anxiety in the foreign language classroom. The session be particularly useful for those interested in topics such as learning motivation, learner well-being, and learner psychology.

Speaking anxiety reduces learners’ willingness to communicate. This session presents the findings of a study carried out with French learners of English. The study sought to explore a subsection of speaking anxiety – specifically, anxiety that arises due to learners’ apprehension about speaking English with a non-native accent, or hereby termed “accent anxiety”.
The session will give a theoretical overview of accent anxiety, before examining the findings of the study by looking at direct quotations from students. The session concludes with some practical solutions for language learners and educators alike to minimise accent anxiety in the foreign language classroom. The session be particularly useful for those interested in topics such as learning motivation, learner well-being, and learner psychology.

Elective Session 2
Quality Assurance Practices; Plan, Do, Check, Act
Leadership & Management

Quality Assurance Practices; Plan, Do, Check, Act

Time: 

Quality Assurance Practices; Plan, Do, Check, Act
Building strong quality assurance practices is one of the key points that leads an organization to success. In order to maintain sustainable standardization, it is crucial to keep certain standards that are highly valued and internalized by the members of the institution. Assuring quality standards is important for success. However, more importantly, providing a consensus on and a feeling of ownership of these standards is crucial. This presentation will highlight the key points of the Quality Assurance practices and the culture that is created alongside them at the foreign languages department of a historical foundation school in Turkey. During the presentation, the journey to lead this standardization will be explained briefly to participants by describing practices that are currently in use and the principles that underpin them.

Quality Assurance Practices; Plan, Do, Check, Act
Building strong quality assurance practices is one of the key points that leads an organization to success. In order to maintain sustainable standardization, it is crucial to keep certain standards that are highly valued and internalized by the members of the institution. Assuring quality standards is important for success. However, more importantly, providing a consensus on and a feeling of ownership of these standards is crucial. This presentation will highlight the key points of the Quality Assurance practices and the culture that is created alongside them at the foreign languages department of a historical foundation school in Turkey. During the presentation, the journey to lead this standardization will be explained briefly to participants by describing practices that are currently in use and the principles that underpin them.

Be EPIC: How to create the best trainers in the industry through continuous development.
Staff Development & Wellbeing

Be EPIC: How to create the best trainers in the industry through continuous development.

Time: 

This presentation will explain how a coherent trainer development program and empower language trainers to strive for self-growth.
Firstly, the pain points experienced by trainers will be highlighted. In particular, the effect these have on their attitude to professional development along with the quality of training sessions with learners.
Next, the details of a comprehensive trainer development program at a language training solutions company in Tokyo will be presented. The view of treating trainers as assets to be invested in and how this was done practically will be shared.
The key elements around the EPIC framework, namely, Expectation, Progression, Incentivization, and Community, will be illustrated with what each of these does to contribute to a holistic approach to trainer development to motivate trainers to improve their skill set and mindset continuously.
Finally, the talk will look at the effect this had on trainers, how it changed their view of personal development and how it encouraged them to strive to be better and improve their own job satisfaction.

This presentation will explain how a coherent trainer development program and empower language trainers to strive for self-growth.
Firstly, the pain points experienced by trainers will be highlighted. In particular, the effect these have on their attitude to professional development along with the quality of training sessions with learners.
Next, the details of a comprehensive trainer development program at a language training solutions company in Tokyo will be presented. The view of treating trainers as assets to be invested in and how this was done practically will be shared.
The key elements around the EPIC framework, namely, Expectation, Progression, Incentivization, and Community, will be illustrated with what each of these does to contribute to a holistic approach to trainer development to motivate trainers to improve their skill set and mindset continuously.
Finally, the talk will look at the effect this had on trainers, how it changed their view of personal development and how it encouraged them to strive to be better and improve their own job satisfaction.

Expanding Language Programs through Assessment-aligned Pathways Leading to Credentials
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

Expanding Language Programs through Assessment-aligned Pathways Leading to Credentials

Time: 

According to a number of recent studies conducted in both the USA and Europe, both language learners and hiring managers are interested in job-specific language abilities as opposed to academic language skills. This trend is evident in the spread of language for specific purpose (LSP) program offerings at all levels of education. However, in order to access content-specific language, it is necessary for learners to obtain a certain level of proficiency in general language. Oftentimes, learners quit learning a language before they even get to the intermediate level needed for LSP courses. One solution for keeping learners in programs and focused on higher proficiency levels is the utilization of pathways. The speaker will outline 5 steps to help programs expand and accelerate using assessment:

  1. benchmark testing;
  2. setting program goals;
  3. defining pathways;
  4. promoting pathways; and,
  5. credentialing learners.

For each step, the speaker will provide examples of current programs and how they instituted these steps in their own programs.

According to a number of recent studies conducted in both the USA and Europe, both language learners and hiring managers are interested in job-specific language abilities as opposed to academic language skills. This trend is evident in the spread of language for specific purpose (LSP) program offerings at all levels of education. However, in order to access content-specific language, it is necessary for learners to obtain a certain level of proficiency in general language. Oftentimes, learners quit learning a language before they even get to the intermediate level needed for LSP courses. One solution for keeping learners in programs and focused on higher proficiency levels is the utilization of pathways. The speaker will outline 5 steps to help programs expand and accelerate using assessment:

  1. benchmark testing;
  2. setting program goals;
  3. defining pathways;
  4. promoting pathways; and,
  5. credentialing learners.

For each step, the speaker will provide examples of current programs and how they instituted these steps in their own programs.

Online vs. Face-to-Face: Some Thoughts on Student Motivation in EAP Classes
Language Teaching & Learning

Online vs. Face-to-Face: Some Thoughts on Student Motivation in EAP Classes

Time: 

Our hypothesis is that student motivation for our two-hour EAP class has dwindled during the two-year period coinciding with COVID-19 due to the decrease of peer-to-peer and teacher-peer connections. In other words, online classes are less motivating than face-to-face classes. We employ surveys and focus group discussions with our nearly 1000 students who take our two courses (English 101 and 102) to both demonstrate the drop in student motivation and suggest ways to improve it. The data suggest that the best way to solve the decrease in motivation is through specific relationship-building strategies and to have real “live” connection points between students and teachers. At the same time, some obstacles stand in the way of increasing motivation in the online environment (if not so much in the face-to-face environment). The presentation will also address these obstacles and look for solutions.

Our hypothesis is that student motivation for our two-hour EAP class has dwindled during the two-year period coinciding with COVID-19 due to the decrease of peer-to-peer and teacher-peer connections. In other words, online classes are less motivating than face-to-face classes. We employ surveys and focus group discussions with our nearly 1000 students who take our two courses (English 101 and 102) to both demonstrate the drop in student motivation and suggest ways to improve it. The data suggest that the best way to solve the decrease in motivation is through specific relationship-building strategies and to have real “live” connection points between students and teachers. At the same time, some obstacles stand in the way of increasing motivation in the online environment (if not so much in the face-to-face environment). The presentation will also address these obstacles and look for solutions.

An invitation to reflect on how to be more DEI-intentional within your institution
Sponsor slot

An invitation to reflect on how to be more DEI-intentional within your institution

Time: 

Our hypothesis is that student motivation for our two-hour EAP class has dwindled during the two-year period coinciding with COVID-19 due to the decrease of peer-to-peer and teacher-peer connections. In other words, online classes are less motivating than face-to-face classes. We employ surveys and focus group discussions with our nearly 1000 students who take our two courses (English 101 and 102) to both demonstrate the drop in student motivation and suggest ways to improve it. The data suggest that the best way to solve the decrease in motivation is through specific relationship-building strategies and to have real “live” connection points between students and teachers. At the same time, some obstacles stand in the way of increasing motivation in the online environment (if not so much in the face-to-face environment). The presentation will also address these obstacles and look for solutions.

Our hypothesis is that student motivation for our two-hour EAP class has dwindled during the two-year period coinciding with COVID-19 due to the decrease of peer-to-peer and teacher-peer connections. In other words, online classes are less motivating than face-to-face classes. We employ surveys and focus group discussions with our nearly 1000 students who take our two courses (English 101 and 102) to both demonstrate the drop in student motivation and suggest ways to improve it. The data suggest that the best way to solve the decrease in motivation is through specific relationship-building strategies and to have real “live” connection points between students and teachers. At the same time, some obstacles stand in the way of increasing motivation in the online environment (if not so much in the face-to-face environment). The presentation will also address these obstacles and look for solutions.

Coffee break & exhibition

Elective Session 3
Email - Friend or Foe?
Leadership & Management

Email - Friend or Foe?

Time: 

Many of the things we do as managers involve the sending and receiving of emails or instant messages. Indeed, it is often difficult to find space to lift our heads from the computer screen. We use these tools every hour of every day, but do we really know what we’re dealing with?
We reflect on how these tools have come to dominate the lives of academic managers, especially those managing increasingly remote teams. We examine the many benefits of email, reflecting on how its frictionless nature aids communication with our teams.
In 2021, Cal Newport envisioned “A World without Email”. We will look at this work, non-ELT case studies and recent research carried out at NILE that highlight some of the negative impacts of these tools on communication, time management and well-being.
The NILE team recently experimented with some alternatives to email, e.g., the use of online bulletin boards. We will review the positive results and make suggestions for how academic managers can adjust their own internal communication protocols to aid communication and staff well-being.

Many of the things we do as managers involve the sending and receiving of emails or instant messages. Indeed, it is often difficult to find space to lift our heads from the computer screen. We use these tools every hour of every day, but do we really know what we’re dealing with?
We reflect on how these tools have come to dominate the lives of academic managers, especially those managing increasingly remote teams. We examine the many benefits of email, reflecting on how its frictionless nature aids communication with our teams.
In 2021, Cal Newport envisioned “A World without Email”. We will look at this work, non-ELT case studies and recent research carried out at NILE that highlight some of the negative impacts of these tools on communication, time management and well-being.
The NILE team recently experimented with some alternatives to email, e.g., the use of online bulletin boards. We will review the positive results and make suggestions for how academic managers can adjust their own internal communication protocols to aid communication and staff well-being.

A roadmap to PD: right or left?
Leadership & Management

A roadmap to PD: right or left?

Time: 

Promoting a humanistic approach and reducing emotional labor are factors that can retain a positive working environment. Both staff and students’ productivity and motivation continue to be unresolved business until management handles it. Helping the team articulate what they want, offering them the development and support they need, and investing time and effort in understanding them helped me draw a tentative road map, not only to their development but well-being as well. Staff development can sometimes focus on their pedagogical skills development; whereas it should focus on keeping staff motivated and helping them develop their own sense of professional identity, and thus humanizing the work field. As a result, everyone can come to work in the morning ready to give their all and manage all the pressure and stress with less burnouts. The session will discuss how management can help teams choose his/her own personal professional development path and it can be adapted to the classroom with one aim in mind: providing support and cultivating attitudes to achieve a productive workplace.

Promoting a humanistic approach and reducing emotional labor are factors that can retain a positive working environment. Both staff and students’ productivity and motivation continue to be unresolved business until management handles it. Helping the team articulate what they want, offering them the development and support they need, and investing time and effort in understanding them helped me draw a tentative road map, not only to their development but well-being as well. Staff development can sometimes focus on their pedagogical skills development; whereas it should focus on keeping staff motivated and helping them develop their own sense of professional identity, and thus humanizing the work field. As a result, everyone can come to work in the morning ready to give their all and manage all the pressure and stress with less burnouts. The session will discuss how management can help teams choose his/her own personal professional development path and it can be adapted to the classroom with one aim in mind: providing support and cultivating attitudes to achieve a productive workplace.

A Needs-Based, Action-Oriented, and Social Curriculum Development Process
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

A Needs-Based, Action-Oriented, and Social Curriculum Development Process

Time: 

Broadening the scope of language education, the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (2001) has recently been updated with the new illustrative descriptor. Having been well-aware of the compatibility of the essence of the newly introduced CEFR Companion Volume (2020) with our institution’s educational philosophy, which is grounded in constructivist learning theory, and promotes action oriented, social, and autonomous learning, we attempted to further improve our English language teaching and learning curriculum by aligning it to the CEFR Companion Volume. In this session, I would like to present how the mapping process of our existing English language learning and teaching curriculum toCEFR- Companion Volume (2020) enabled English Preparatory School’s academic team to integrate the institutions’ educational philosophy, learning outcomes, teaching and learning pedagogy, assessment and evaluation processes, and instructional materials into the curriculum document during the curriculum development process. It was demanding, however, and a great learning experience.

Broadening the scope of language education, the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (2001) has recently been updated with the new illustrative descriptor. Having been well-aware of the compatibility of the essence of the newly introduced CEFR Companion Volume (2020) with our institution’s educational philosophy, which is grounded in constructivist learning theory, and promotes action oriented, social, and autonomous learning, we attempted to further improve our English language teaching and learning curriculum by aligning it to the CEFR Companion Volume. In this session, I would like to present how the mapping process of our existing English language learning and teaching curriculum toCEFR- Companion Volume (2020) enabled English Preparatory School’s academic team to integrate the institutions’ educational philosophy, learning outcomes, teaching and learning pedagogy, assessment and evaluation processes, and instructional materials into the curriculum document during the curriculum development process. It was demanding, however, and a great learning experience.

Promoting the Learner as a Social Agent: Employing the Critical Pedagogy and Literature in ELT class
Language Teaching & Learning

Promoting the Learner as a Social Agent: Employing the Critical Pedagogy and Literature in ELT class

Time: 

The aim of this session is to examine the effectiveness and necessity of using authentic texts in EFL classes in light of Critical pedagogy, which was pioneered by Paulo Freire. Critical Pedagogy views teaching as a political act and focuses on discussing hot topics such as social class, gender, inequality, race, or sexual discrimination in the class environment. To this end, this session entails a sample lesson where the students discuss all the above-mentioned issues via a literary text(Desiree’s Baby by Kate Chopin), which paves the way for the participants to deliberate over the advantages and challenges of using this philosophy in the class environment. The aim of using this perspective in the class is to raise the awareness of the students about the crucial problems of the society of the time, to ensure their being creative and critical individuals, and ultimately to make them respect the differences. Furthermore, it will contribute to their macro skills such as reading authentic texts and speaking on them.

The aim of this session is to examine the effectiveness and necessity of using authentic texts in EFL classes in light of Critical pedagogy, which was pioneered by Paulo Freire. Critical Pedagogy views teaching as a political act and focuses on discussing hot topics such as social class, gender, inequality, race, or sexual discrimination in the class environment. To this end, this session entails a sample lesson where the students discuss all the above-mentioned issues via a literary text(Desiree’s Baby by Kate Chopin), which paves the way for the participants to deliberate over the advantages and challenges of using this philosophy in the class environment. The aim of using this perspective in the class is to raise the awareness of the students about the crucial problems of the society of the time, to ensure their being creative and critical individuals, and ultimately to make them respect the differences. Furthermore, it will contribute to their macro skills such as reading authentic texts and speaking on them.

Sustainable Wellbeing Literacy
Sponsor slot

Sustainable Wellbeing Literacy

Time: 

This session is designed to focus on well-being literacy as it is crucial to implement a sustainable well-being culture at schools compared to exposing students and teachers to short-term well-being experiences to set a positive teaching and learning culture at school. The World Health Organization defines wellbeing as a state in which the individual realizes own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to contribute to the community, making it reasonable to state that only with sustained wellbeing can an individual feel fulfillment and satisfaction in life. Therefore, it is worth going deeper from the well-being awareness and practices to sustainable well-being literacy culture. This session is aimed at presenting the updates of the current literature on well-being literacy and significance of social-emotional learning as the basis of the well-being state and then moving to some practical solutions to flourish sustainable well-being literacy in the classroom referring to cognitive behavioural therapy and positive psychology.

This session is designed to focus on well-being literacy as it is crucial to implement a sustainable well-being culture at schools compared to exposing students and teachers to short-term well-being experiences to set a positive teaching and learning culture at school. The World Health Organization defines wellbeing as a state in which the individual realizes own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to contribute to the community, making it reasonable to state that only with sustained wellbeing can an individual feel fulfillment and satisfaction in life. Therefore, it is worth going deeper from the well-being awareness and practices to sustainable well-being literacy culture. This session is aimed at presenting the updates of the current literature on well-being literacy and significance of social-emotional learning as the basis of the well-being state and then moving to some practical solutions to flourish sustainable well-being literacy in the classroom referring to cognitive behavioural therapy and positive psychology.

Elective Session 4
Managers and leaders - see how you can engage and inspire your teams through these challenging times
Leadership & Management

Managers and leaders - see how you can engage and inspire your teams through these challenging times

Time: 

Employee engagement has become the top issue for many leaders in the education and ELT sectors, pointing towards new models of management and leadership.
But what does employee engagement even mean? What do these new models look like? How can they be known, shaped and implemented?
And once implemented in the institution, how do we measure engagement and set benchmarks to follow, and promote our institution as an employer of first choice?
This presentation investigates these issues and provides a forum for understanding and action. It focuses on how we build institutions where passion is valued and staff are proactive about adding value in their work while aligning with the institutions’ mission and goals.
We will ask:
How can we raise the level of personal investment staff bring to work every day?
What place is there for HR and L&D systems and processes in building an engaged staff force? How can they promote fairness, openness and integrity in their processes – recruitment, promotion, learning & development, appraisal and duty of care – that give rise to better engagement?

Employee engagement has become the top issue for many leaders in the education and ELT sectors, pointing towards new models of management and leadership.
But what does employee engagement even mean? What do these new models look like? How can they be known, shaped and implemented?
And once implemented in the institution, how do we measure engagement and set benchmarks to follow, and promote our institution as an employer of first choice?
This presentation investigates these issues and provides a forum for understanding and action. It focuses on how we build institutions where passion is valued and staff are proactive about adding value in their work while aligning with the institutions’ mission and goals.
We will ask:
How can we raise the level of personal investment staff bring to work every day?
What place is there for HR and L&D systems and processes in building an engaged staff force? How can they promote fairness, openness and integrity in their processes – recruitment, promotion, learning & development, appraisal and duty of care – that give rise to better engagement?

Using Digital Stories to Foster Productive Skills of University Students
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

Using Digital Stories to Foster Productive Skills of University Students

Time: 

In language classrooms, different approaches are used to develop learners’ four skills effectively. It has been realised that stories play a significant role in developing the speaking and writing skills of learners. Through the development of technology, digital storytelling has become a part of the education system. In the process of storytelling, learners need to choose an emotional topic, decide on a dramatic question and make a story by using ‘canvas’ or ‘story jumper.’ The learners use their own photographs as parts of their stories. Through the voice recorder, they record their voices and share them with their classmates. Each student produced 2 digital stories. After eight weeks, it was found that students developed their productive skills (speaking and writing).

In language classrooms, different approaches are used to develop learners’ four skills effectively. It has been realised that stories play a significant role in developing the speaking and writing skills of learners. Through the development of technology, digital storytelling has become a part of the education system. In the process of storytelling, learners need to choose an emotional topic, decide on a dramatic question and make a story by using ‘canvas’ or ‘story jumper.’ The learners use their own photographs as parts of their stories. Through the voice recorder, they record their voices and share them with their classmates. Each student produced 2 digital stories. After eight weeks, it was found that students developed their productive skills (speaking and writing).

Towards innovative education in Portuguese for Timorese teachers
Language Teaching & Learning

Towards innovative education in Portuguese for Timorese teachers

Time: 

Although in East Timor curricula and manuals are provided in Portuguese, only a small percentage of teachers are sufficiently proficient in the language to teach the Timorese curriculum. Moreover, a legacy of decades-old pedagogical practices, brought during Indonesian rule, translates into teaching practices based on passivity and lack of autonomy on the part of both teachers and students. The PRO-Português project trains Timorese teachers who will serve as Portuguese teacher trainers in the Timorese public school system. This presentation aims to show how it contributes to strengthening linguistic, scientific and pedagogical skills. Emphasis is given to how engaging trainees in their own learning process and using their knowledge of the educational context develops their autonomy and engages them in the transformation of East Timor’s educational system, as well as its presence in the lusophone world.

Although in East Timor curricula and manuals are provided in Portuguese, only a small percentage of teachers are sufficiently proficient in the language to teach the Timorese curriculum. Moreover, a legacy of decades-old pedagogical practices, brought during Indonesian rule, translates into teaching practices based on passivity and lack of autonomy on the part of both teachers and students. The PRO-Português project trains Timorese teachers who will serve as Portuguese teacher trainers in the Timorese public school system. This presentation aims to show how it contributes to strengthening linguistic, scientific and pedagogical skills. Emphasis is given to how engaging trainees in their own learning process and using their knowledge of the educational context develops their autonomy and engages them in the transformation of East Timor’s educational system, as well as its presence in the lusophone world.

Case Studies: Using GELnet and Data to Drive Improvements
Sponsor slot

Case Studies: Using GELnet and Data to Drive Improvements

Time: 

GEL’s automated unit tests were implemented by Twin English Centres as part of a weekly assessment programme. The result of this provided detailed data on student progress and reduced admin load on staff. The reporting dashboards offered by GEL are used to monitor student performance and help managers track how schools perform. Eaquals Accredited Member, EC English, found that these dashboards provided a consistent student experience across locations.  A further example of use is from St Giles International who used the GEL Aims system to provide automatic and editable weekly plans for teachers and students. They found that this enabled teachers to focus on teaching and the students had evidence that they are on a well-planned course.

GEL’s automated unit tests were implemented by Twin English Centres as part of a weekly assessment programme. The result of this provided detailed data on student progress and reduced admin load on staff. The reporting dashboards offered by GEL are used to monitor student performance and help managers track how schools perform. Eaquals Accredited Member, EC English, found that these dashboards provided a consistent student experience across locations.  A further example of use is from St Giles International who used the GEL Aims system to provide automatic and editable weekly plans for teachers and students. They found that this enabled teachers to focus on teaching and the students had evidence that they are on a well-planned course.

29th
Saturday Programme

Elective Session 5
Flexibility of choice of language courses vs. quality management at the WUT Foreign Language Centre
Leadership & Management

Flexibility of choice of language courses vs. quality management at the WUT Foreign Language Centre

Time: 

The presentation will start with a short overview of the system of language education at SJO PW – the obligatory B2examination and exemptions from it, the options students have prior to the B2 examination and after they have passed it, as well as students who have to comply with different regulations (extra-mural students, English-medium students). This overview will show why there is a need for great flexibility for students and why we offer so many language courses at so many different levels. Such a complicated system requires quality management in terms of enrolment and monitoring student progress. I will also focus on the advantages and disadvantages of the system, as well as possible future changes to it, which could be made in order to address new developments in language education (new components of CEFR, such as mediation, as well as new methods of assessment and teaching, such as project-based learning, design thinking).

The presentation will start with a short overview of the system of language education at SJO PW – the obligatory B2examination and exemptions from it, the options students have prior to the B2 examination and after they have passed it, as well as students who have to comply with different regulations (extra-mural students, English-medium students). This overview will show why there is a need for great flexibility for students and why we offer so many language courses at so many different levels. Such a complicated system requires quality management in terms of enrolment and monitoring student progress. I will also focus on the advantages and disadvantages of the system, as well as possible future changes to it, which could be made in order to address new developments in language education (new components of CEFR, such as mediation, as well as new methods of assessment and teaching, such as project-based learning, design thinking).

Not just talking: dialogic reflection in teacher development
Staff Development & Wellbeing

Not just talking: dialogic reflection in teacher development

Time: 

Most would agree that reflection is key to teacher development and there are many ways of reflecting on practice. One effective way to stimulate reflection is to discuss important moments that happen in class with colleagues. This talk focuses on dialogic reflection and presents teachers and educators with practical examples of how to stimulate this kind of reflection by exploring critical incidents in class. This talk draws on the findings of a teacher-led CPD initiative which examined how teachers worked with emergent language and responded to learners in class. This talk will present interesting findings that came out of the teacher-led discussions. Attendees of this talk will be presented with practical ideas on how to set up teacher-driven CPD, create communities of practice, and encourage or engage in dialogic reflection.

Most would agree that reflection is key to teacher development and there are many ways of reflecting on practice. One effective way to stimulate reflection is to discuss important moments that happen in class with colleagues. This talk focuses on dialogic reflection and presents teachers and educators with practical examples of how to stimulate this kind of reflection by exploring critical incidents in class. This talk draws on the findings of a teacher-led CPD initiative which examined how teachers worked with emergent language and responded to learners in class. This talk will present interesting findings that came out of the teacher-led discussions. Attendees of this talk will be presented with practical ideas on how to set up teacher-driven CPD, create communities of practice, and encourage or engage in dialogic reflection.

Sustaining Language Diversity through Assessment and Certification
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

Sustaining Language Diversity through Assessment and Certification

Time: 

The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (1992) established standards to “foster a knowledge of the culture, language, and history of the national minorities” and “the recognition of the right to learn a minority language”. A nationalistic focus on integration and assimilation rather than multiculturalism may not view linguistic diversity as a national asset. Educational systems include students with indigenous and immigrant minority languages without systems to identify, sustain, or recognize their languages. Traditional foreign language learners may be unaware of their own CEFR level. A proven US solution is to celebrate language diversity through a Seal of Biliteracy earned via assessment of all 4 language domains. Language certification based on CEFR levels creates the need for standards-based course alignment, formative assessments to benchmark progress, and PD so educators understand the “Can-Dos” of each level and can move students from one level to the next. Importantly, certificates are highly valued by students and increase learner engagement and autonomy.

The European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (1992) established standards to “foster a knowledge of the culture, language, and history of the national minorities” and “the recognition of the right to learn a minority language”. A nationalistic focus on integration and assimilation rather than multiculturalism may not view linguistic diversity as a national asset. Educational systems include students with indigenous and immigrant minority languages without systems to identify, sustain, or recognize their languages. Traditional foreign language learners may be unaware of their own CEFR level. A proven US solution is to celebrate language diversity through a Seal of Biliteracy earned via assessment of all 4 language domains. Language certification based on CEFR levels creates the need for standards-based course alignment, formative assessments to benchmark progress, and PD so educators understand the “Can-Dos” of each level and can move students from one level to the next. Importantly, certificates are highly valued by students and increase learner engagement and autonomy.

Inclusive Teaching Practices in English Language Classrooms
Language Teaching & Learning

Inclusive Teaching Practices in English Language Classrooms

Time: 

The ongoing mobility patterns around the world have diversified our English language classrooms – highlighting the importance of equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in the teaching and learning processes. EDI-informed reflective teaching practices can allow for more inclusive learning experiences. Instilling an EDI-informed learning culture within our teaching practices encourage teachers to identify, recognize and demonstrate values from diverse perspectives. However, sometimes it can be challenging for teachers to initiate inclusive pedagogical practices that are suitable for culturally, linguistically, and cognitively diverse students.
In this presentation, we will explore some existing frameworks for inclusive pedagogy including Dimitrov and Haque’sIntercultural Teaching Competence Framework and Universal Design of Learning, and how to draw from these frameworks in a language classroom for inclusive teaching. We will look at practical solutions for making our classrooms inclusive by reviewing some common English language classroom activities.

The ongoing mobility patterns around the world have diversified our English language classrooms – highlighting the importance of equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in the teaching and learning processes. EDI-informed reflective teaching practices can allow for more inclusive learning experiences. Instilling an EDI-informed learning culture within our teaching practices encourage teachers to identify, recognize and demonstrate values from diverse perspectives. However, sometimes it can be challenging for teachers to initiate inclusive pedagogical practices that are suitable for culturally, linguistically, and cognitively diverse students.
In this presentation, we will explore some existing frameworks for inclusive pedagogy including Dimitrov and Haque’sIntercultural Teaching Competence Framework and Universal Design of Learning, and how to draw from these frameworks in a language classroom for inclusive teaching. We will look at practical solutions for making our classrooms inclusive by reviewing some common English language classroom activities.

Elective Session 6
Can we agree to disagree? Managing conflict: A guide for managers at schools
Leadership & Management

Can we agree to disagree? Managing conflict: A guide for managers at schools

Time: 

Many studies conducted in ELT management to examine the theories and resolutions of conflict at workplace underline the crucial role of managers at mitigating against conflict. However; there are few studies on how managers should fulfil this HR role in an ELT context and how they should supervise the process of conflict management successfully. In the light of this issue, this presentation will give insights regarding the nature of conflict at workplace and how a team of managers working at a foundation university in Turkey identifies and utilizes various strategies for conflict management. In this study, the managers are provided with a questionnaire and some case studies to find out how they approach and resolve different types of conflict through various conflict-handling styles and strategies. The presentation will provide the educators who would like to empower themselves with what is entailed in conflict management and the strategies with practical recommendations that are applicable to any educational setting.

Many studies conducted in ELT management to examine the theories and resolutions of conflict at workplace underline the crucial role of managers at mitigating against conflict. However; there are few studies on how managers should fulfil this HR role in an ELT context and how they should supervise the process of conflict management successfully. In the light of this issue, this presentation will give insights regarding the nature of conflict at workplace and how a team of managers working at a foundation university in Turkey identifies and utilizes various strategies for conflict management. In this study, the managers are provided with a questionnaire and some case studies to find out how they approach and resolve different types of conflict through various conflict-handling styles and strategies. The presentation will provide the educators who would like to empower themselves with what is entailed in conflict management and the strategies with practical recommendations that are applicable to any educational setting.

How to empower the community of practice at your workplace
Staff Development & Wellbeing

How to empower the community of practice at your workplace

Time: 

It is crucial to maintain professional development for teachers, managers and all ELT professionals and stakeholders. Hence, we experimented how creating a community of practice where everyone is mentored would affect the work environment positively. The results are beyond expectations because this community is empowered by openness to change and feedback. The team could achieve better results together. We knew that the community of practice proved success when we could attract more customers after applying some brainstormed and well-thought of ideas from all members in that community.

It is crucial to maintain professional development for teachers, managers and all ELT professionals and stakeholders. Hence, we experimented how creating a community of practice where everyone is mentored would affect the work environment positively. The results are beyond expectations because this community is empowered by openness to change and feedback. The team could achieve better results together. We knew that the community of practice proved success when we could attract more customers after applying some brainstormed and well-thought of ideas from all members in that community.

A tool for self-assessment and improvement of Spanish Programs for adult migrants
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

A tool for self-assessment and improvement of Spanish Programs for adult migrants

Time: 

The international study Language Training for Adult Migrants (OECD, 2021) brings together recommendations to facilitate the design and development of language programmes for the integration of adult migrants. In our communication we check the characteristics that this international study associates with effective language training in migration contexts and presents a tool that can be used for self-assessment and improvement of entities with Spanish language programmes for adult migrants.

The international study Language Training for Adult Migrants (OECD, 2021) brings together recommendations to facilitate the design and development of language programmes for the integration of adult migrants. In our communication we check the characteristics that this international study associates with effective language training in migration contexts and presents a tool that can be used for self-assessment and improvement of entities with Spanish language programmes for adult migrants.

Connecting Language Learners Internationally with Engaging Interpersonal Activities
Language Teaching & Learning

Connecting Language Learners Internationally with Engaging Interpersonal Activities

Time: 

In our continuously changing world, skills such as: ICT literacy, responsibility, problem-solving, creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, and communication, have to be of teachers’ main interest. Engaging language learners in international activities is a great solution as it accelerates students’ development of the key skills and their fluency in all 4 language skills. Adapting ICT adds value to the teaching itself, but also makes the learning process more enjoyable. Internet-based activities open new doors to practically endless sources of knowledge. Working with ICT and the Internet fosters the most important key skills for the 21st century. Easy access to the Internet allows for international collaboration and supports personal growth, creativity and ICT literacy. International collaborative projects (e.g. Global Classroom Pair-Share, eTwinning) help students develop their open-mindedness, cross-cultural awareness and respect in a supportive learning environment.

In our continuously changing world, skills such as: ICT literacy, responsibility, problem-solving, creativity, critical thinking, collaboration, and communication, have to be of teachers’ main interest. Engaging language learners in international activities is a great solution as it accelerates students’ development of the key skills and their fluency in all 4 language skills. Adapting ICT adds value to the teaching itself, but also makes the learning process more enjoyable. Internet-based activities open new doors to practically endless sources of knowledge. Working with ICT and the Internet fosters the most important key skills for the 21st century. Easy access to the Internet allows for international collaboration and supports personal growth, creativity and ICT literacy. International collaborative projects (e.g. Global Classroom Pair-Share, eTwinning) help students develop their open-mindedness, cross-cultural awareness and respect in a supportive learning environment.

The International Education Mark and the CEFR – a case study
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

The International Education Mark and the CEFR – a case study

Time: 

English language schools in Ireland that apply for the new statutory International Education Mark (IEM) will undergo an assessment of their compliance against the Code of Practice for English Language Education and the Quality Assurance Guidelines for English Language Education Providers. As part of this assessment, providers are required to align their programmes to the CEFR. At QQI, we have developed a project to help language centres develop, or further develop, this alignment. In this presentation, I will outline the work we have been doing on CEFR alignment with providers in preparation for the launch of the IEM and beyond.

English language schools in Ireland that apply for the new statutory International Education Mark (IEM) will undergo an assessment of their compliance against the Code of Practice for English Language Education and the Quality Assurance Guidelines for English Language Education Providers. As part of this assessment, providers are required to align their programmes to the CEFR. At QQI, we have developed a project to help language centres develop, or further develop, this alignment. In this presentation, I will outline the work we have been doing on CEFR alignment with providers in preparation for the launch of the IEM and beyond.

Coffee break & exhibition

Elective Session 7
Scaling Quality in University-Level Language Education Through a Learning Organization Model
Leadership & Management

Scaling Quality in University-Level Language Education Through a Learning Organization Model

Time: 

Academic programs in English Medium Instruction (EMI) institutions rely on Schools of Foreign Languages (SFL) to prepare students linguistically so they may succeed academically. This means that quality in the SFL has a reverberating effect across the institution. This also places a good deal of pressure on the SFL to achieve and maintain high standards of quality – from instructors to curriculum and assessment systems to services and facilities.
Achieving consistency in quality is often easier said than done, given that many SFLs in EMI institutions comprise large populations of diverse staff. The challenge for leadership, despite such variation, is to foster, facilitate, and sustain quality across the SFL.
This session proposes that SFLs can up-scale quality by utilizing the Learning Organization model, which posits that effective learning organizations comprise a set of so-called building blocks. This session deconstructs these building blocks, presenting his effective culture change model in a practical, consumable form

Academic programs in English Medium Instruction (EMI) institutions rely on Schools of Foreign Languages (SFL) to prepare students linguistically so they may succeed academically. This means that quality in the SFL has a reverberating effect across the institution. This also places a good deal of pressure on the SFL to achieve and maintain high standards of quality – from instructors to curriculum and assessment systems to services and facilities.
Achieving consistency in quality is often easier said than done, given that many SFLs in EMI institutions comprise large populations of diverse staff. The challenge for leadership, despite such variation, is to foster, facilitate, and sustain quality across the SFL.
This session proposes that SFLs can up-scale quality by utilizing the Learning Organization model, which posits that effective learning organizations comprise a set of so-called building blocks. This session deconstructs these building blocks, presenting his effective culture change model in a practical, consumable form

Online CPD: Where next?
Staff Development & Wellbeing

Online CPD: Where next?

Time: 

Over the past year, TransformELT has investigated the situation of online CPD across seven countries in Asia: Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia and Bangladesh. This involved cataloging providers and their offers, conducting interviews with key stakeholders including focus groups with teachers and supervisors, as well as surveys of large numbers of teachers in each country.
The insights from these studies will be shared in this presentation. Trends and directions will be highlighted, along with commentary on what participants in different contexts prefer and what they do not want. There will also be an opportunity for the audience to consider how their own teachers might respond differently to the survey questions and what considerations we should be taking into account when creating and promoting online CPD within our own institutions. Alternative forms of OCPD will be presented and discussed.

Over the past year, TransformELT has investigated the situation of online CPD across seven countries in Asia: Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia and Bangladesh. This involved cataloging providers and their offers, conducting interviews with key stakeholders including focus groups with teachers and supervisors, as well as surveys of large numbers of teachers in each country.
The insights from these studies will be shared in this presentation. Trends and directions will be highlighted, along with commentary on what participants in different contexts prefer and what they do not want. There will also be an opportunity for the audience to consider how their own teachers might respond differently to the survey questions and what considerations we should be taking into account when creating and promoting online CPD within our own institutions. Alternative forms of OCPD will be presented and discussed.

Are you ready for accreditation?
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

Are you ready for accreditation?

Time: 

Quality assurance involves the systematic review of educational provision to maintain and improve its quality, equity and efficiency. It encompasses school self-evaluation, external evaluation (including inspection), the evaluation of teachers and school leaders, and student assessments. The advantages of gaining and maintaning accreditation and quality certification are two-fold; internal; a high qualilty sustainable language programme and external; certification and networking along with prestige. Yet, acquiring accreditation is not the end of the process but the beginning of it all.
This accreditation journey can be examined in three main phases; preparation, practice and production, which resembles the 3P model (preparation, practice and production). Similar to that, in this session, the experience of institutions will be examined through self evaluation questions:

  • Reasons for acquiring accreditation
  • Pre-requistes for accreditation
  • Outcomes / benefits
  • Maintaining quality in the long run

Quality assurance involves the systematic review of educational provision to maintain and improve its quality, equity and efficiency. It encompasses school self-evaluation, external evaluation (including inspection), the evaluation of teachers and school leaders, and student assessments. The advantages of gaining and maintaning accreditation and quality certification are two-fold; internal; a high qualilty sustainable language programme and external; certification and networking along with prestige. Yet, acquiring accreditation is not the end of the process but the beginning of it all.
This accreditation journey can be examined in three main phases; preparation, practice and production, which resembles the 3P model (preparation, practice and production). Similar to that, in this session, the experience of institutions will be examined through self evaluation questions:

  • Reasons for acquiring accreditation
  • Pre-requistes for accreditation
  • Outcomes / benefits
  • Maintaining quality in the long run
Developing teaching principles through an all-inclusive approach
Language Teaching & Learning

Developing teaching principles through an all-inclusive approach

Time: 

Between May 2018 and September 2021, our teachers and students engaged in a qualitative research study on our schools’ teaching principles. Together with our director, we led an inclusive study to explore and draw up our teaching principles on the following research questions: What are our key teaching principles as perceived by our instructors and by our students?
The key tools used with teachers were an online survey with open-ended questions based on their teaching experiences, perceptions, and beliefs, document and corpus analysis, and workshops over a fifteen-month period. We also carried out a focus group interview discussing learners’ perceptions of our teaching principles based on their language learning experiences. These stages were followed by in-depth data analysis by teachers and students, comparative analysis of teacher and student views, and finally the publication of our school’s teaching principles.
This presentation will focus on the different stages of the research and discuss recommendations for institutions wishing to carry out similar research studies.

Between May 2018 and September 2021, our teachers and students engaged in a qualitative research study on our schools’ teaching principles. Together with our director, we led an inclusive study to explore and draw up our teaching principles on the following research questions: What are our key teaching principles as perceived by our instructors and by our students?
The key tools used with teachers were an online survey with open-ended questions based on their teaching experiences, perceptions, and beliefs, document and corpus analysis, and workshops over a fifteen-month period. We also carried out a focus group interview discussing learners’ perceptions of our teaching principles based on their language learning experiences. These stages were followed by in-depth data analysis by teachers and students, comparative analysis of teacher and student views, and finally the publication of our school’s teaching principles.
This presentation will focus on the different stages of the research and discuss recommendations for institutions wishing to carry out similar research studies.

The personal journey of self-directed professional development; how to decide which path to take
Sponsor slot

The personal journey of self-directed professional development; how to decide which path to take

Time: 

How do we guide our own professional development? What considerations do we need to make? How do we create a plan of action? What ‘success’ looks like in the face of self-directed professional development is dependent on the receiver. Much like our learners, educators are all different in their needs, learning styles, and motives for development. This workshop will showcase how a framework for professional development can help to determine which direction to take, and will demonstrate the practical approaches we can take in curating and guiding our own professional development.

How do we guide our own professional development? What considerations do we need to make? How do we create a plan of action? What ‘success’ looks like in the face of self-directed professional development is dependent on the receiver. Much like our learners, educators are all different in their needs, learning styles, and motives for development. This workshop will showcase how a framework for professional development can help to determine which direction to take, and will demonstrate the practical approaches we can take in curating and guiding our own professional development.

Elective Session 8
A Reflection and Development Tool for Managers: ‘The EAQUALS AMCF’
Leadership & Management

A Reflection and Development Tool for Managers: ‘The EAQUALS AMCF’

Time: 

This talk focuses on how two managers in the School of Languages of a foundation university in Turkey benefit from ‘the Eaquals Academic Management Competency Framework (AMCF)’. As managers, the presenters contemplated the ways of benefitting from this framework as a CPD tool. Upon familiarizing themselves with the framework and adapting it to their school context, the presenters used it as a self-evaluation tool and turned it into an evaluation form through which they received feedback on their effectiveness from different stakeholders including the School Director and the teachers they work with. Triangulating the data collated, the presenters created an action plan for themselves for the following academic year. In this talk, the presenters will share the steps followed to adapt the AMCF to their work context and how this practical use of the framework can help managers lead their teams more effectively. Doing so, the presenters hope to inspire the participants to benefit from AMCF to identify their strengths and areas to improve as managers and devise their development plans.

This talk focuses on how two managers in the School of Languages of a foundation university in Turkey benefit from ‘the Eaquals Academic Management Competency Framework (AMCF)’. As managers, the presenters contemplated the ways of benefitting from this framework as a CPD tool. Upon familiarizing themselves with the framework and adapting it to their school context, the presenters used it as a self-evaluation tool and turned it into an evaluation form through which they received feedback on their effectiveness from different stakeholders including the School Director and the teachers they work with. Triangulating the data collated, the presenters created an action plan for themselves for the following academic year. In this talk, the presenters will share the steps followed to adapt the AMCF to their work context and how this practical use of the framework can help managers lead their teams more effectively. Doing so, the presenters hope to inspire the participants to benefit from AMCF to identify their strengths and areas to improve as managers and devise their development plans.

Tackling climate change with a sustainability course
Course Design, CEFR & Assessment

Tackling climate change with a sustainability course

Time: 

In this session we will present our Sustainability Special Interest Course. The course begins with the fundamentals of climate science, with topics such as global warming and its consequences; weather, climate and the atmosphere; the greenhouse effect and what is causing it; the carbon cycle and man-made emissions; feedback loops and land conversion. It gives an overview of the current global goals set by politics and science on climate change, and then sustainability and solutions. Students explore solutions within the spheres of politics, economy, society and technology, as well as looking at what we can all do as individuals. The goal is to show students a variety of solutions and to give hope and motivation for upcoming challenges and opportunities. Regular features in the lessons have students bust myths, celebrate good news, quiz their knowledge and reflect. We will show sample pair- and group work activities, as well as teacher comments and student projects with the aim to inspire other schools to develop similar projects.

In this session we will present our Sustainability Special Interest Course. The course begins with the fundamentals of climate science, with topics such as global warming and its consequences; weather, climate and the atmosphere; the greenhouse effect and what is causing it; the carbon cycle and man-made emissions; feedback loops and land conversion. It gives an overview of the current global goals set by politics and science on climate change, and then sustainability and solutions. Students explore solutions within the spheres of politics, economy, society and technology, as well as looking at what we can all do as individuals. The goal is to show students a variety of solutions and to give hope and motivation for upcoming challenges and opportunities. Regular features in the lessons have students bust myths, celebrate good news, quiz their knowledge and reflect. We will show sample pair- and group work activities, as well as teacher comments and student projects with the aim to inspire other schools to develop similar projects.

Innovative Approaches to Boosting Students’ Self-Efficacy in English Classes
Language Teaching & Learning

Innovative Approaches to Boosting Students’ Self-Efficacy in English Classes

Time: 

Self-efficacy, learners’ belief that they can learn and improve, has an essential role in the Danish curriculum. However, in a classroom full of students from different backgrounds and a wide range of proficiency levels, teachers find it challenging to create an engaging and positive language learning environment.
In this talk, as project coordinators, we will share best practices from a three-year-long international project (iBUILD-IT, 2020-1-NL01-KA226-SCH-083132) in which English teachers from three countries (the Netherlands, Denmark, and Finland) have been collaborating on data-driven, research-based English language teaching practices to create equal learning opportunities for all students.
With specific examples from the Danish context, we also aim to guide the participants on successfully integrating innovative approaches to boost learners’ self-efficacy in English classes through differentiation while revealing potential challenges and ways to overcome them.

Self-efficacy, learners’ belief that they can learn and improve, has an essential role in the Danish curriculum. However, in a classroom full of students from different backgrounds and a wide range of proficiency levels, teachers find it challenging to create an engaging and positive language learning environment.
In this talk, as project coordinators, we will share best practices from a three-year-long international project (iBUILD-IT, 2020-1-NL01-KA226-SCH-083132) in which English teachers from three countries (the Netherlands, Denmark, and Finland) have been collaborating on data-driven, research-based English language teaching practices to create equal learning opportunities for all students.
With specific examples from the Danish context, we also aim to guide the participants on successfully integrating innovative approaches to boost learners’ self-efficacy in English classes through differentiation while revealing potential challenges and ways to overcome them.

'Revisiting the Humanistic Approach to Learning for the Digital Era'
Sponsor slot

'Revisiting the Humanistic Approach to Learning for the Digital Era'

Time: 

Should we be teaching or instead creating an engaging and inclusive environment where all students can learn? This talk will start by revisiting principles from the humanistic approach to learning and explore the extent to which the role of a teacher shifts to a facilitator and role model, aiming to increase intrinsic motivation and “excitement” in the classroom. An overview of key tenets of the humanistic learning theory developed by Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and James F. T. Bugental in the 20th century will be outlined, in order to then ask the pertinent question: what is the role of the humanistic approach in the digital era?

This talk will argue that many of the principles of the approach still hold scientific relevance today –as understanding our learners is the key to successful, long-lasting and impactful teaching. I will discuss how the humanistic approach to language learning in my experience enhances not only linguistic competencies, but also helps develop emotionally positive attitudes in students. I will also show how methodologies such as project-based learning, task-based learning, and new technologies such as virtual reality can be used as a metacognitive tool which enforces the idea of learning by doing. By engaging students in hands-on experiences and reflection, they are better able to connect theories and knowledge learned in the classroom to real-world situations.

Should we be teaching or instead creating an engaging and inclusive environment where all students can learn? This talk will start by revisiting principles from the humanistic approach to learning and explore the extent to which the role of a teacher shifts to a facilitator and role model, aiming to increase intrinsic motivation and “excitement” in the classroom. An overview of key tenets of the humanistic learning theory developed by Abraham Maslow, Carl Rogers, and James F. T. Bugental in the 20th century will be outlined, in order to then ask the pertinent question: what is the role of the humanistic approach in the digital era?

This talk will argue that many of the principles of the approach still hold scientific relevance today –as understanding our learners is the key to successful, long-lasting and impactful teaching. I will discuss how the humanistic approach to language learning in my experience enhances not only linguistic competencies, but also helps develop emotionally positive attitudes in students. I will also show how methodologies such as project-based learning, task-based learning, and new technologies such as virtual reality can be used as a metacognitive tool which enforces the idea of learning by doing. By engaging students in hands-on experiences and reflection, they are better able to connect theories and knowledge learned in the classroom to real-world situations.

Lunch & exhibition

Elective Session 9
Difficult conversations made easier
Leadership & Management

Difficult conversations made easier

Time: 

In any challenging situation, including confrontation, our emotions tend to run high and we risk saying things we later regret. Why? Often because in the heat of the moment we become less careful of how we say things.
Constructive communication patterns, if understood fully and used consistently, can change team communication in stressful situations. Result? Better understanding within the team, more openness to listen to the other side and productive, rather than destructive conflict resolution. This in turn leads to a willingness to treat confrontation as a challenge to be solved together, a higher level of team cohesion and more productive work practices.
In this practical workshop we will examine and practise some constructive communication patterns. We will also look at how using these patterns consistently can change team dynamics.

In any challenging situation, including confrontation, our emotions tend to run high and we risk saying things we later regret. Why? Often because in the heat of the moment we become less careful of how we say things.
Constructive communication patterns, if understood fully and used consistently, can change team communication in stressful situations. Result? Better understanding within the team, more openness to listen to the other side and productive, rather than destructive conflict resolution. This in turn leads to a willingness to treat confrontation as a challenge to be solved together, a higher level of team cohesion and more productive work practices.
In this practical workshop we will examine and practise some constructive communication patterns. We will also look at how using these patterns consistently can change team dynamics.

Design Thinking and Student Experience (SDX) Design
Leadership & Management

Design Thinking and Student Experience (SDX) Design

Time: 

This session will start with a comprehensive explanation of the links between why higher-education leaders should adapt a customer-oriented service innovation and improvement mindset into their educational context. Then, the basic terminology behind the student experience design and management (value proposition, empathizing, micro-moments, touch-points,moments-of-truth, etc.) will be introduced. Later, the design thinking and fundamental principles of it (human-centered,evidence-based, holistic, iterative, sequential, etc.) will be presented being backed with the rationale behind each. Finally, the design thinking processes (Research, define, ideate, prototype, launch and scale), and tools (persona, empathy mapping, system mapping, prototyping, business model canvas, etc.) will be introduced. This part will include hands-on activities where the participants will practice some of the design thinking tools. The tasks will facilitate idea and experience sharing among the participants, which will help them interrelate the new concepts and their institutional experiences.

This session will start with a comprehensive explanation of the links between why higher-education leaders should adapt a customer-oriented service innovation and improvement mindset into their educational context. Then, the basic terminology behind the student experience design and management (value proposition, empathizing, micro-moments, touch-points,moments-of-truth, etc.) will be introduced. Later, the design thinking and fundamental principles of it (human-centered,evidence-based, holistic, iterative, sequential, etc.) will be presented being backed with the rationale behind each. Finally, the design thinking processes (Research, define, ideate, prototype, launch and scale), and tools (persona, empathy mapping, system mapping, prototyping, business model canvas, etc.) will be introduced. This part will include hands-on activities where the participants will practice some of the design thinking tools. The tasks will facilitate idea and experience sharing among the participants, which will help them interrelate the new concepts and their institutional experiences.

How to tackle the challenges when market demand builds walls for growth?
Staff Development & Wellbeing

How to tackle the challenges when market demand builds walls for growth?

Time: 

The workshop will create space for all who are interested in discussing and sharing about the labour market changes, where much effort must be put not to lose existing customers, and to attract new customers. The same applies to employees. In addition, VUCA world created uncertainty among employees and the team’s efficiency decreased. Therefore, in groups you will find the answers for the question: How can leaders and people responsible for employee development involve more employees in the company’s development activities and how to reduce resistance to new ideas? Thirdly, you will receive solution-focused input through a story of the company (Language School and Competency Centre), where a fixed mindset and limiting beliefs became an obstacle to move forward with the developments. Moreover, you will leave the session with at least3 steps what you must take for better future. It will be done either in pairs or small groups. Welcome to the workshop if you are interested in what future skills and leadership trends are which contribute to the happiness of employees and clients!

The workshop will create space for all who are interested in discussing and sharing about the labour market changes, where much effort must be put not to lose existing customers, and to attract new customers. The same applies to employees. In addition, VUCA world created uncertainty among employees and the team’s efficiency decreased. Therefore, in groups you will find the answers for the question: How can leaders and people responsible for employee development involve more employees in the company’s development activities and how to reduce resistance to new ideas? Thirdly, you will receive solution-focused input through a story of the company (Language School and Competency Centre), where a fixed mindset and limiting beliefs became an obstacle to move forward with the developments. Moreover, you will leave the session with at least3 steps what you must take for better future. It will be done either in pairs or small groups. Welcome to the workshop if you are interested in what future skills and leadership trends are which contribute to the happiness of employees and clients!

Integrating Technology into Language Teaching
Language Teaching & Learning

Integrating Technology into Language Teaching

Time: 

Technology has proved itself to increase the motivation and sense of autonomy of learners, take learning beyond the traditional classroom environment, and be a vital source for teachers to support learners. When applied properly, it enhances learning as learners are exposed to the target language and various types of learning. In addition to integrating the SAMR model, it is critical for teachers to have SMART objectives before even considering using technology in teaching languages. This collaborative workshop initially aims to create new perspectives in digital (and context-specific) material design for teaching and set realistic goals in delivery. Participants will modify and redefine a lesson plan with technological tools provided to them in the session and discuss the potential practices. In the second step, they will redesign the existing materials of the lesson by integrating technology and via working in pairs or groups, they will explore their practicality for online or face-to-face classes.  (To have maximum collaboration, participants will be asked to use their laptops)

Technology has proved itself to increase the motivation and sense of autonomy of learners, take learning beyond the traditional classroom environment, and be a vital source for teachers to support learners. When applied properly, it enhances learning as learners are exposed to the target language and various types of learning. In addition to integrating the SAMR model, it is critical for teachers to have SMART objectives before even considering using technology in teaching languages. This collaborative workshop initially aims to create new perspectives in digital (and context-specific) material design for teaching and set realistic goals in delivery. Participants will modify and redefine a lesson plan with technological tools provided to them in the session and discuss the potential practices. In the second step, they will redesign the existing materials of the lesson by integrating technology and via working in pairs or groups, they will explore their practicality for online or face-to-face classes.  (To have maximum collaboration, participants will be asked to use their laptops)

“Multilingua’s Old Town game” in Actionbound
Language Teaching & Learning

“Multilingua’s Old Town game” in Actionbound

Time: 

“Multilingua’s Old Town game” in Actionbound is a learning method where language student is taken to Old Town environment.
The aim of the game is to practice language in language environment combined with getting to know Old Town of Tallinn -famous UNESCO’s cultural heritage site. In addition, students expand their digital knowledge. During the game students walk, communicate and cooperate to find answers. Actionbound guides to orientate in old town. It is possible to play individually, in a pair or in a group. The game is available for all, in Estonian, in Russian, in English and in Spanish.
The original game takes around 1.5-2h. The game takes place in the open air of Tallinn old town. Participants need a smartphone. We would like to add Actiondbound into the program either night before the conference or the day after the conference It is also possible to choose a short version of 60 minutes.
Multilingua’s Old Town game got a European Language Lable 2022 in Estonia.

“Multilingua’s Old Town game” in Actionbound is a learning method where language student is taken to Old Town environment.
The aim of the game is to practice language in language environment combined with getting to know Old Town of Tallinn -famous UNESCO’s cultural heritage site. In addition, students expand their digital knowledge. During the game students walk, communicate and cooperate to find answers. Actionbound guides to orientate in old town. It is possible to play individually, in a pair or in a group. The game is available for all, in Estonian, in Russian, in English and in Spanish.
The original game takes around 1.5-2h. The game takes place in the open air of Tallinn old town. Participants need a smartphone. We would like to add Actiondbound into the program either night before the conference or the day after the conference It is also possible to choose a short version of 60 minutes.
Multilingua’s Old Town game got a European Language Lable 2022 in Estonia.

Elective Session 10
Design Thinking and Employee Experience Design: Implications for Leadership and Management
Leadership & Management

Design Thinking and Employee Experience Design: Implications for Leadership and Management

Time: 

This interactive session will start by highlighting the significance of strategic HR management and employee branding for an institution. Conceptual and practical fundamentals of strategic recruitment, onboarding, acculturation, and talent management will be addressed. The presenter will combine the initial concepts with the principles behind employee experience design. (Why should employee experience be designed?) Later, design thinking and the underlying principles will be introduced. Finally, the design thinking processes (observing, learning, designing, and validating) and tools (mapping, canvas, matrix, profiling, etc.) will be introduced to ensure a concrete understanding of the proposed methodology. (How can employee experience be designed?) The theoretical part will be supported and enriched with hands-on activities where the participants will be actively involved with design thinking tools and discuss ways of applying these to their contexts.

This interactive session will start by highlighting the significance of strategic HR management and employee branding for an institution. Conceptual and practical fundamentals of strategic recruitment, onboarding, acculturation, and talent management will be addressed. The presenter will combine the initial concepts with the principles behind employee experience design. (Why should employee experience be designed?) Later, design thinking and the underlying principles will be introduced. Finally, the design thinking processes (observing, learning, designing, and validating) and tools (mapping, canvas, matrix, profiling, etc.) will be introduced to ensure a concrete understanding of the proposed methodology. (How can employee experience be designed?) The theoretical part will be supported and enriched with hands-on activities where the participants will be actively involved with design thinking tools and discuss ways of applying these to their contexts.

Inspirations from flipped learning and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
Staff Development & Wellbeing

Inspirations from flipped learning and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

Time: 

I first came across the concept of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in the initial stages of my sabbatical project in Spring of 2022 and simply fell in love with it! I even found myself changing the nature and course of my project to work on a new training course inspired by UDL and flipped learning. Born out of the idea that what is essential for some is actually good for all, UDL is an educational framework that aims to improve and optimize teaching and learning through multiple means of engagement, representation, and action and expression. In preparation for our workshop, I would like to invite you to watch a mini video on flipped learning @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quoTkqgavlY so that we can devote more time to practical implementations of UDL in teaching and in training.

I first came across the concept of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in the initial stages of my sabbatical project in Spring of 2022 and simply fell in love with it! I even found myself changing the nature and course of my project to work on a new training course inspired by UDL and flipped learning. Born out of the idea that what is essential for some is actually good for all, UDL is an educational framework that aims to improve and optimize teaching and learning through multiple means of engagement, representation, and action and expression. In preparation for our workshop, I would like to invite you to watch a mini video on flipped learning @ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quoTkqgavlY so that we can devote more time to practical implementations of UDL in teaching and in training.

Spotlight on learning: putting a new spin on classroom practice.
Language Teaching & Learning

Spotlight on learning: putting a new spin on classroom practice.

Time: 

This workshop will look at humanistic thinkers, philosophers and psychologists and their influence on education, still relevant today.
We will:

  • look at examples of teacher-led and learner-led activities and discuss how both have their place in the classroom.
  • show how it is the learning and engagement in the learning process that is of utmost importance through discussion tasks.
  • highlight classroom practice where, by placing the process of learning at the centre, we see how both models can complement each other and have their role to play in the development of the learner.
  • set out to show how important it is that the teacher’s focus is on the learning taking place in the classroom.
  • practice noticing and homing in on visible and auditory clues from the learners as they engage in the tasks, to ensure teacher support for each individual learner and their development.
  • demonstrate how sharing objectives and assessment criteria is an important part of a learning-centred classroom if we are to help our learners achieve and benchmark progress.

This workshop will look at humanistic thinkers, philosophers and psychologists and their influence on education, still relevant today.
We will:

  • look at examples of teacher-led and learner-led activities and discuss how both have their place in the classroom.
  • show how it is the learning and engagement in the learning process that is of utmost importance through discussion tasks.
  • highlight classroom practice where, by placing the process of learning at the centre, we see how both models can complement each other and have their role to play in the development of the learner.
  • set out to show how important it is that the teacher’s focus is on the learning taking place in the classroom.
  • practice noticing and homing in on visible and auditory clues from the learners as they engage in the tasks, to ensure teacher support for each individual learner and their development.
  • demonstrate how sharing objectives and assessment criteria is an important part of a learning-centred classroom if we are to help our learners achieve and benchmark progress.
Dealing with emergent learner language needs and the TTT approach
Language Teaching & Learning

Dealing with emergent learner language needs and the TTT approach

Time: 

The term emergent language continues to attract a great deal of attention and its importance continues to be recognised. The Test Teach Test (TTT) approach is one that, when used effectively and efficiently, allows the teacher to focus on real learner language needs. In my experience as a trainer, learning to listen to the learners and then act on this information is one of themost challenging skills for trainee teachers and practising teachers to acquire and develop.
We will do this by first revisiting and clarifying what the stages of this approach entail and what their focus is; we will then consider the teacher and possible learner roles in these stages; this will lead to a discussion on how to act on the information gleaned from the initial stages; and finally how to ensure that at the end of the lesson, learners have a better understanding of the language that was actually new to them (at the start of the lesson) and that they have had the chance to practice this language in conjunction with other known quantities in a useful and personalised way.

The term emergent language continues to attract a great deal of attention and its importance continues to be recognised. The Test Teach Test (TTT) approach is one that, when used effectively and efficiently, allows the teacher to focus on real learner language needs. In my experience as a trainer, learning to listen to the learners and then act on this information is one of themost challenging skills for trainee teachers and practising teachers to acquire and develop.
We will do this by first revisiting and clarifying what the stages of this approach entail and what their focus is; we will then consider the teacher and possible learner roles in these stages; this will lead to a discussion on how to act on the information gleaned from the initial stages; and finally how to ensure that at the end of the lesson, learners have a better understanding of the language that was actually new to them (at the start of the lesson) and that they have had the chance to practice this language in conjunction with other known quantities in a useful and personalised way.

Coffee break & exhibition

Elective Session 11
Developing a Learning Teaching Organisation
Leadership & Management

Developing a Learning Teaching Organisation

Time: 

This presentation is the final part of two previous Eaquals talks we have given on Developing and Implementing a Vision for a Learning Teaching Organization. We are currently two years into the process of embedding systems for exchanging knowledge and learning in our LTO. We have been developing our own vision of learning and attempting to share that vision with our learners, staff and partners. This is the story of the many challenges we faced and some of the successes we shared.

This presentation is the final part of two previous Eaquals talks we have given on Developing and Implementing a Vision for a Learning Teaching Organization. We are currently two years into the process of embedding systems for exchanging knowledge and learning in our LTO. We have been developing our own vision of learning and attempting to share that vision with our learners, staff and partners. This is the story of the many challenges we faced and some of the successes we shared.

The Future of English; implications for employers and career oriented learners
Language Teaching & Learning

The Future of English; implications for employers and career oriented learners

Time: 

The nature of the demand for English among employers and career focussed learners is constantly evolving as economies and working environments change and develop. We will examine and reflect on the current and future implications of these changes and the implications for creating teaching and learning opportunities to meet these needs.
The presentation draws on a major British Council programme of research called The Future of English, providing insights on trends that will define the role of English as a global language. In early 2023, we will publish a book summarising the project and detailing the eight thematic areas of interest that are likely to have a major impact on the future of English over the next decade.
In this presentation, we will introduce these eight areas, and then focus on aspects of English for work and employability. We shall look at the demands of employers, desires of those seeking to enhance their careers through English and what this will mean for us in providing teaching and learning opportunities to help people meet their goals in the years to come.

The nature of the demand for English among employers and career focussed learners is constantly evolving as economies and working environments change and develop. We will examine and reflect on the current and future implications of these changes and the implications for creating teaching and learning opportunities to meet these needs.
The presentation draws on a major British Council programme of research called The Future of English, providing insights on trends that will define the role of English as a global language. In early 2023, we will publish a book summarising the project and detailing the eight thematic areas of interest that are likely to have a major impact on the future of English over the next decade.
In this presentation, we will introduce these eight areas, and then focus on aspects of English for work and employability. We shall look at the demands of employers, desires of those seeking to enhance their careers through English and what this will mean for us in providing teaching and learning opportunities to help people meet their goals in the years to come.

Latest tricks of the trade for the wellbeing of teachers and students
Staff Development & Wellbeing

Latest tricks of the trade for the wellbeing of teachers and students

Time: 

Sir Ken Robinson once said: “Great teachers … are mentors, coaches, motivators and life-long sources of inspiration for their students.” Our new role became particularly evident during the pandemic: we had to create optimal learning conditions with the changed reality, and that was not an easy task. In the session, we will go through the basics of well-being and achieving mindfulness. Next, activities for anxiety reduction, for both teachers and students, will be presented and tested. We will see how to relax students and activate their learning mindset. Also, there will be strategies students can use on their own to help themselves outside school. Finally, we will look at some free online resources and share our experiences.

Sir Ken Robinson once said: “Great teachers … are mentors, coaches, motivators and life-long sources of inspiration for their students.” Our new role became particularly evident during the pandemic: we had to create optimal learning conditions with the changed reality, and that was not an easy task. In the session, we will go through the basics of well-being and achieving mindfulness. Next, activities for anxiety reduction, for both teachers and students, will be presented and tested. We will see how to relax students and activate their learning mindset. Also, there will be strategies students can use on their own to help themselves outside school. Finally, we will look at some free online resources and share our experiences.

Closing plenary: Who’s the best person to manage your teachers’ professional development?

Closing plenary: Who’s the best person to manage your teachers’ professional development?

Time: 

We know every teacher is different. Each educator is in the best position to judge what they need to work on, know what professional development activities are helpful, set out their goals, plan their time for PD, etc. So why do many teachers struggle when they’re left to manage their PD on their own?

This session will look at the various obstacles to self-directed professional development and discuss what schools can do to help their teachers overcome them. Together, we will explore a new approach that supports teachers to become leaders of their own professional development journey.

We know every teacher is different. Each educator is in the best position to judge what they need to work on, know what professional development activities are helpful, set out their goals, plan their time for PD, etc. So why do many teachers struggle when they’re left to manage their PD on their own?

This session will look at the various obstacles to self-directed professional development and discuss what schools can do to help their teachers overcome them. Together, we will explore a new approach that supports teachers to become leaders of their own professional development journey.

Conference Closing

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